z-order trick

Submitted By: Lazur Date: January 07, 2015, 07:21:23 PM Views: 2069
Summary: A concept on how to solve the problem of drawing objects that partially hide eachother.



Illustrations is svg, hosted at openclipart.
Download and open it with inkscape for better zooming.


Can duplicate objects by pressing Ctrl+D,
and move objects up and down in the z-ordering with the Home (moves to top)
End (moves to bottom)
and PgUp, PgDwn buttons. 

Clipping description in the manual.


Probably the object on top would be better if made with a clone instead of a dupliacant, and, with a bit more trick the clipping object can be modified in a live way too.
Also related: http://www.inkscapeforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=17939#p66455.

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Lazur
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May 07, 2015, 09:02:46 PM
Made this svg recently, which is an example of all objects covering eachother a bit.
brynn
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January 20, 2015, 07:40:45 AM
Sorry, my mistake  :-$
Lazur
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January 09, 2015, 02:11:52 PM
Quote
In this case, clipping is necessary to create the top object, because the original objects are imported raster ("bitmap") images.  If you are working with all vector objects, it might be more efficient to use node editing or path operations (union, difference, etc.) to create the top object.


The originals are vectrors actually, coming from openclipart.
Clipping was used because that is faster than editing all the paths.
The guitar on the right is using flat fills on its paths, one above eachother, with altered colours. Probably created with somekind of interpolation.

The left one was using filters; somekind of clipping could take a better use there -the original could be improved by that too.


Masking can also give a quick solution for creating the object on top, but it may not get saved well to pdf-s.
brynn
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January 09, 2015, 12:07:33 AM
In this case, clipping is necessary to create the top object, because the original objects are imported raster ("bitmap") images.  If you are working with all vector objects, it might be more efficient to use node editing or path operations (union, difference, etc.) to create the top object.