Author Topic: .CDR files to .DWG  (Read 1352 times)

October 25, 2018, 08:47:14 AM
Read 1352 times

g8trb8@

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I have over 3000 files that were created in corel draw that need to be imported into AutoCAD. Some of the files have objects that are "hidden" behind other objects as if they are 3D. I have tried to export to PDF, DXF, DWG, etc, and I am unable to get the image to come to AutoCAD as a WYSIWYG image. It brings the image in as wireframe therefore my AUTOCAD image is congested and unusable without major editing. I have tried to BITMAP the image as well, but it become too pixelated to be usable. AS you can see in the attached images. I would like the image to be flattened to give me only the lines and objects shown, not the wireframe image when it is imported.

Any help is appreciated. I have also posted in multiple other forums to try and get some help.
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October 25, 2018, 02:44:59 PM
Reply #1

phiscribe

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I don't know enough about AutoCAD to know what might work.  2D vector to 3D is often problematic.  Have you tried EPS?  That said, maybe the trial version of CorelDRAW Technical Suite 2018 would be worth a go.  It includes CorelDraw, and CorelDesigner.  You would have to be quick to do 3000 files before the trial dies, otherwise it is close to $1000.  Designer is 3D and most likely I would think to export to something AutoCAD will deal with.

3000 is a heap of files.  You probably are looking to automate.  If the eps out of Inkscape worn't work, I don't know what to suggest.  A link to a sample cdr file might help.
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October 25, 2018, 03:16:13 PM
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Lazur

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Hi.

As far as I'm concerned you are quite out of luck with the problem.
Because by the underlying vector structure "what you see" is NOT what's rendered -"what you get"- on screen -hence it's not wysiwyg at first place.
The outlines only view is what really is wysiwyg.

Probably there is not a trivial solution that could solve the problem by an algorithm. There could be alot of different other parametres like the involvement of clipping, pattern fills etc.
The only solution I can think of may or may not suit your needs and also needs testing&some precaution.

The process is: underlying vectors--->rendering to screen pixels--->tracing the raster image back to vectors.
So at first it'd need the images exported as raster images at the highest possible (or one that "fits") resolution, with each stroke rendered with a hairline. There is a style setting in the svg to achieve the latter; I would need  to look that up, not sure about the exact name.
Then, you would need to set up a centerline tracing process. Inkscape doesn't have one centerline tracer built in by default, although I remember there is some extension for it you can add custom?
Trace the raster image and you'd end up with something close.
As it all depends on the algorithm of the tracer, how it deciphers crossing lines or structures the geometry/topology; how many nodes it would add on a curve etc.
A high number of nodes may capture all the small quirks the original images had but they may not be so necessary everywhere.
If too many, they could halt the performance when working further on the traced images -needs testing of the original export resolution.

(Actually as it's for cad use, as a purist's note: Béziers are never exact after a cut, so even if it was possible at first place to "flatten" your image it wouldn't be a 100% match, just a 99,999999%.)

October 26, 2018, 07:00:12 PM
Reply #3

Lazur

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On a second thought if you are interested to reproduce the rendered result only, you may not need centerline tracing but could use the built-in trace bitmap option.
With that, instead of polylines you could end up having fills -which again may or may not work. Needs testing.

October 27, 2018, 02:45:17 PM
Reply #4

brynn

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Welcome to the forum!

So these are CDR files?  What happens when you import them into AutoCAD?

I think Inkscape can open CDR files.  Have you tried to open one?  If so, what format did you export?  What happens when you open in AutoCAD?

I don't have AutoCAD, so I can't test that part for you.  But I'd be glad to test opening a CDR in Inkscape, and exporting to some other format, whatever AutoCAD can accept. 

Can you share one of those files for testing?
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